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6 English phrases that don’t mean what you think they mean.

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6 English phrases that don’t mean what you think they mean.

6 English phrases that don’t mean what you think they mean. In this blog I will explain some English phrases that have totally different meanings to the words used! Level: B1 Language: English Reading Time: 6 minutes Have you been to England? When you were in England did you hear someone say, “I have no idea what you are talking about”. Or maybe you heard an English person say “you must come to my house for dinner”. Did you know that these phrases don’t mean what the words say! Some people think that learning a language is learning words, phrases, and grammar. Those people are right, but to truly communicate in any language you have to understand a little of the culture of the country. In this blog post I will explain some of the true meanings behind what English people say! Usual Text Some people think that the English are very reserved, who don’t say what they mean. We at Smart Language Solutions Do English think the phrase “I have no idea what you are talking about” is a perfect example of saying one thing and meaning another. Before I continue I want to tell you that this lesson is not about “double entendres”. Double entendres are something different, click here for more information about double entendres. Look again at the phrase: “I have no idea what you are talking about” If you read the words you might think the speaker does not understand what someone else is saying. Example A: Speaker 1 – Relative theory is very easy, light travels at 299792458 meters per second in a vacuum and this is called “C” hence nothing can travel faster than light or C in a vacuum. Speaker 2 – I have no idea what you are talking about. The example is very clear, speaker 2 does not understand the physics of E=MC2. In a situation like this an English person would not normally use the phrase “I have no idea what you are talking about”, they would simply say something like, “I don’t understand”. Here is a more realistic example, of when to use “I have no idea what you are talking about”. Example B: Speaker 1 – When we went out for dinner last time I paid the bill. Speaker 2 – I have no idea what you are talking about. In this example speaker 1 says that they paid the bill in the restaurant the last time. Speaker 2 does not agree, and in fact speaker 2 thinks that speaker 1 either does not correctly remember what happened or is lying. We use the phrase “I have no idea what you are talking about” when we want to express 1 – When we think someone has made a mistake. 2 – When we think some is lying. When we are 100% positive someone is lying we use the phrase, “are you sure?”. Example C what is said: Speaker 1 – I travelled to Japan last year! Speaker 2 – Are you sure? When you hear an English person use the phrase, “are you sure?” they are not asking you if you are sure, they are telling you, they think you are lying. Example D, what it means: Speaker 1 – I travelled to Japan last year! Speaker 2 – You’re a liar, you did not go to Japan last year. NOTE: The phrase “he/she has no idea what they are talking about” means what it says. Here are some other British phrases that have different meanings to the words used. I have to think very hard about that. Example E, what is said: Speaker 1 – I think we should buy a new house! Speaker 2 – I have to think very hard about that. I have to think very hard about that = It will never happen. Example F, what it means: Speaker 1 – I think we should buy a new house! Speaker 2 – No, it will never happen. This is a new development Example G, what is said: Speaker 1 – As you all know we will move to a new office at the end of the year. Speaker 2 – This is a new development. This is a new development = You didn’t tell me this before and why not? Example H, what it means: Speaker 1 – As you all know we will move to a new office at the end of the year. Speaker 2 – You told everyone else, but you didn’t tell me, why not? Well that was fun Example I, what is said: Speaker one – Well that was fun. Speaker two – Really! Well that was fun = I hated it. Example J, what it means: Speaker one – I hated it Speaker two – I liked it. It’s an option Example K, what is said: Speaker 1 – What about going to France on holiday. Speaker 2 – It’s an option. It’s an option = It will never happen. Example L, what it means: Speaker 1 – What about going to France on holiday. Speaker 2 – No. Come to my house for dinner Example M, what is said: Speaker 1 – You must come to my house for dinner Speaker 2 – You too! Come to my house for dinner = It is nice to know you, but DON’T come to my house Example N, what it means: Speaker 1 – You’re a nice person, but I don’t want you to come to my house. Speaker 2 – You are nice too, but don’t come to my house. QUESTIONS Is knowledge of grammar, vocabulary and construction enough to fully understand a language? Yes of course They will help you communicate but unfortunately language is connected with the culture. If an English person says to you “you must come to my house for dinner”, what are they really telling you? You must come for dinner Please don’t come to my house I don’t like you at all Is an option really an option in the phrase: “it’s an option” Yes No A person who says, “that’s a new development” is… Happy about the new development Unhappy about the new development “I have no idea what you are talking about” is… Slang Double Entendre Figure or Speech If an English person didn’t enjoy something, they might say… Well I really didn’t like that Well that was fun We shouldn’t do that again When an English person says “I have to think very hard about that” you should… Look forward to a positive response. Wait for them to get back to you with a decision. Forget about your idea. Are you sure? = You are a lying Think again Meme Text: Six English phrases that don’t mean what you think they mean. Some people think that learning a language is learning words, phrases, and grammar. Those people are right, but to truly communicate in any language you have to understand a little of the culture of the person speaking. Here are six phrases that have a different meaning to the words used. “I have no idea what you are talking about” = I think you have made a mistake, or I think you are lying. “Are you sure about that” = I am 100% convinced you are lying. “I have to think very hard about that” = What you suggest will not happen. “That’s a new development” = Why did you not tell me? “It’s an option” = It is NOT an option. “Come to my house for dinner” = Don’t come to my house for dinner. But only in a vacuum! You MUST come to my house for dinner Communication is more than words and grammar!

Aprende el significado de la expresión inglesa: “on the back foot”

En este post de Do English te explicaremos el significado de: “on the back foot”. Nivel: B1 Reading Tiempo: 5 Minutos Al finalizar esta clase gratuita de inglés, encontrarás un breve y divetido test referente a este post. Después de leer esta clase, puedes practivar y aprender nuevas expresiones en las clases gratuitas de inglés en: Do English. Todos nuestros tutores son nativos anglo-parlantes y las clases son en aulas virtuales con audio, video, pizarras y todo ello organizado en grupos reducidos de 3 a 10 alumnos como tú. Clases inglés online Aprende inglés cómodamente desde tu casa, la oficina o incluso, desde una cafetería si así lo deseas. RESERVA SESIONES GRATIS Te ahorrarás 35€. 30€ Correspondiente a una clase ‘one to one’ y 5€ correspondiente a una clase colectiva Haz click aquí para aprender inglés online con Do English. Click aquí para leer el blog post en español.

What is the foot?

The foot is the part of your body that is at the end of your leg. Just like you hand, which is at the end of your arms, each foot has five little things at the end of it. The things at the end of your hand are called fingers and thumbs, and in English, unlike other languages, the things at the end of your feet are called toes. Foot is singular and feet is plural. Some animals don’t have feet; they have paws or hoofs. alt=

Does the expression, on the back foot, have anything to do with feet?

No the idiomatic expression “on the back foot” has absolutely nothing to do with feet, paws or hoofs! Think of a boxing match, with two people in the ring. Now think of one person who is winning and one person who is losing that boxing match. The person who is winning is walking forward and the person who is losing is walking backward, and this is where the idiom “on the back foot” comes from. clases de inglés online In English the expression “on the back foot” is used, mostly in sport, to describe when a team or a sports person is losing or in a defensive position. Example:
“What a shock, Knaphill FChave the mighty Manchester United on the backfoot, leading by 2 – 0 with just 1 minute to go”
The idiom can also be used in non-sporting situations. Military
“In operation Desert Storm, the Iraqi army was on the back foot from the moment the allied forces crossed the border”
Business
“Stocks are on the back foot as stock market falls in value”
The idiom “to be on the back foot” means, to be in a losing or defensive position. RESERVA SESIONES GRATIS Te ahorrarás 35€. 30€ Correspondiente a una clase ‘one to one’ y 5€ correspondiente a una clase colectiva   clases de inglés online If you have never seen a game of rugby or the famous Irish victory over the All Blacks in 2016, click play.

¿Qué es un pie?

Un pie es la parte del cuerpo que está al final de la pierna. ASí como las manos, que están al final de los brazos, cada pie tiene cinco protuberancias al final, llamadas dedos, pero en inglés en los pies no son dedos (fingers), sino ‘toes’. Foot es singular y feet es plural. Algunos animales no tienen pies, tienen garras o pezuñas. clases de inglés online RESERVA SESIONES GRATIS Te ahorrarás 35€. 30€ Correspondiente a una clase ‘one to one’ y 5€ correspondiente a una clase colectiva  

¿La expresión ‘on the back foot’, tiene algo que ver con los pies?

Pues la respuesta es que no, la expresión “on the back foot” no tiene nada que ver con pies , garras o pezuñas! Ahora piensa un momento en una pelea de boxeo, en los púgiles. Ahora piensa que hay un ganador de la pelea y otro que la ha perdido. El púgil que va ganando está caminando hacia adelante y la que va perdiendo va caminando hacia atrás, se va retirando, y de ahí viene el significado de “on the back foot”. Así que en inglés la expresión “on the back foot” se usa, principalmente en deportes, para expresar que un equipo o un deportista está perdiendo o está en una actitud defensiva. Ejemplo:
“What a shock, Knaphill FChave the mighty Manchester United on the back foot, leading by 2 – 0 with just 1 minute to go”
Esta expresión también puede usarse en situaciones habituales, y no sólo en deporte. Expresión militar:
“In operation Desert Storm, the Iraqi army was on the back foot from the moment the allied forces crossed the border”
Negocios
“Stocks are on the back foot as stock market falls in value”
The idiom “to be on the back foot” significa estar perdiendo o en situación desfavorable. clases de inglés online RESERVA SESIONES GRATIS Te ahorrarás 35€. 30€ Correspondiente a una clase ‘one to one’ y 5€ correspondiente a una clase colectiva   [WpProQuiz 7]

¿Por qué deberías apuntarte a las classes de inglés online con Do English?

Porque en do-english.es somos profesores nativos de inglés con una amplia experiencia en la docencia. Llevamos enseñando inglés online desde hace más de 8 años. Empezamos enseñando inglés individualmente con Skype. Posteriormente comenzamos con grupos reducidos por Skype. Y ahora hemos comenzado las clases tanto individualmente como en pequeños grupos en nuestras aulas virtuales. Ofrecemos clases en grupos reducidos que quieren aprender inglés y que están en el mismo nivel que tú. Debido a que tenemos grupos reducidos y no sólo individualmente, podemos ofrecer las clases de inglés a un coste asequible y contratar al mismo tiempo a profesores nativos con amplia experiencia.

¿Cómo puedo aprender inglés en un aula virtual?

Cuando accedes al aula virtual, podrás tener acceso a todo el material de estudio, a todas las herramientas exactamente igual que en un aula física. Tu profesor de inglés será angloparlante y todos los cursos y libros están actualizados y avalados por ‘the Oxford University press’. Nuestras aulas virtuales tiene los mismos materiales que las aulas reales:
  • Pizarras para escribir.
  • Pantallas para presentaciones.
  • Vídeo, podrás ver a tu profesor y al resto de alumnos.
  • Voz, podrás escuchar a tu profesor y al resto de tus compañeros.
  • Grabación, podrás ver y escuchar de nuevo tu clase de inglés.
  • Acceso a nuestra librería de inglés.
RESERVA SESIONES GRATIS Te ahorrarás 35€. 30€ Correspondiente a una clase ‘one to one’ y 5€ correspondiente a una clase colectiva   Text: Feargal Coffey – feargal@do-english.es © Do English 2017 Translation: Juan Luis Ramon Cervera – juan@do-english.es Meme: Feargal Coffey Images: Pixabay #English #Idiom #Sport #On #The #Back #Foot

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